Stand Mixer Whole Wheat French Bread

Stand Mixer Whole Wheat French Bread

What good is that stand mixer if it doesn’t do the work for you? Give it something to do with this great tasting whole wheat French bread.

Since awarding my Julia Child’s Bread the #1 rating for 2010, I have though of repeating it but now I wanted minimal work with some whole wheat for a healthier outcome.

With minimal hand kneading (that you can probably skip if you’re morally opposed to manual work) this is for the lazy out there. I used the Julia recipe as a guide. I sub in a cup of whole wheat flour and upped the water to make up for that.

I went through 3 rises but 2 would do. Timing: about 20 minutes prep, 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours rising (2 vs 3) and 25 minutes cooking. Make it 3 1/2 to 4 1/5 hours. But only 20 minutes direct attention plus baking.

Rating

rating system 4

Excellent taste and texture.

Notes: I ended up using my Williams-Sonoma Goldtouch™ Nonstick Perforated French Bread Pan. This dough is too “light” to stand up by itself. If you decrease the hydration some, you could bake it on a pizza stone. I used water on the surface and in the oven plus a high temperature for a crisper crust. You could bake this in a dutch oven or other pan also. Just be aware of the internal temperature.

grill under snow

Cold weather baking notes: I warmed the mixing bowl initially. I then heated an over to 170. As soon as it reached that temp. I turned off the oven and let the heat element cool off for about a minute  or two before using the oven as my “warm spot”.

ingredients for recipe
What you will need.

bloom yeast
Measure water and check temp with instant read thermometer. Add yeast and mix well. Spray dough hook with PAM and attach to mixer.
bubbles from yeast
Mix flours and salt in stand mixer bowl. After yeast starts foaming (about 7 minutes), turn mixer on two and slowly add yeast mixture. After about 3 minutes you need to decide if the dough is just right, too dry or too wet. If just right, there will about 2-3 inches attached to the bottom of the pan. If too dry, the dough is not sticking to the pan. If too wet, then it will be attaching to the side of the pan. Add water or flour 1 tablespoon at a time to get to the right hydration. After the right hydration is achieved, continue to knead for another 6-7 minutes.
put dough on floured surface
Move dough to a floured surface.
a few hand kneads
Hand knead the dough for about 30 seconds.
give the pan a good spray of PAMSpray inside of pan with PAM and place back in pan.
cover with plastic wrap

Cover with plastic wrap and place in warm spot.

allow to double in size
Allow to rise until at least double in size (about 90 minutes).
Punch down doug
Punch down dough and turn it on itself several times. Cover again and let rise until a least double in size again (about 1 hour). Preheat over to 450 degrees. Place a large pan with water on bottom rack.
divide onto pan
Move dough to floured surface and divide into half and shape into loaves of about 10 inches long and 2 inch diameter. Spray pan with PAM and
place loaves on pan. Cover with towel and place in warm spot until double in size.
brush with water
Slash top of loaves with 5-6 release cuts to allow for over spring. Brush top with water and place in oven.
brush with water after 5 minutes in oven
After 5-6 minutes, brush top of loaves with water again. Continue to bake until internal temp of about 200 degrees (about 23-25 minutes total).
Cool on rack
Cool on rack for 20 minutes before cutting.

Stand Mixer Whole Wheat French Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
What good is that stand mixer if it doesn't do the work for you? Give it something to do with this great tasting whole wheat French bread.
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Cuisine: French
Serves: 2 loaves
Ingredients
  • 2½ cups bread flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1½ cup plus
  • 2 T water 105 to 110 degrees
  • 2¼ t instant yeast
  • ½ t salt
Instructions
  1. Measure water and check temp with instant read thermometer. Add yeast and mix well. Spray dough hook with PAM and attach to mixer.
  2. Mix flours and salt in stand mixer bowl. After yeast starts foaming (about 7 minutes), turn mixer on two and slowly add yeast mixture.
  3. After about 3 minutes you need to decide if the dough is just right, too dry or too wet. If just right, there will about 2-3 inches attached to the bottom of the pan. If too dry, the dough is not sticking to the pan. If too wet, then it will be attaching to the side of the pan. Add water or flour 1 tablespoon at a time to get to the right hydration.
  4. After the right hydration is achieved, continue to knead for another 6-7 minutes.
  5. Move dough to a floured surface. Spray inside of pan with PAM. Hand knead the dough for about 30 seconds and place back in pan, cover with plastic wrap and place in warm spot.
  6. Allow to rise until at least double in size (about 90 minutes). Punch down dough and turn it on itself several times. Cover again and let rise until a least double in size again (about 1 hour).
  7. Preheat over to 450 degrees. Place a large pan with water on bottom rack
  8. Move dough to floured surface and divide into half and shape into loaves of about 10 inches long and 2 inch diameter. Spray pan with PAM and place loaves on pan. Cover with towel and place in warm spot until double in size.
  9. Slash top of loaves with 5-6 release cuts to allow for over spring. Brush top with water and place in oven.
  10. After 5-6 minutes, brush top of loaves with water again. Continue to bake until internal temp of about 200 degrees (about 23-25 minutes total).
  11. Cool on rack for 20 minutes before cutting.

Last Updated
September 21 2014

Comments

  1. says

    I’m a “dough is dough” guy. Shape it or put it in any pan you want. Also the temp can be varied as long as you get it done so that is why I do internal temp.

    If you put this in a large loaf pan and bake at say 375 it might take 45 minutes (just a guess) and the crust wouldn’t be as crunchy. I don’t feel this dough had enough strength to bake on a pizza stone(my initial plan) or on a cookie sheet.

  2. says

    Just spent the day making this recipe and must have messed up somewhere along the way. I didn’t have any problems with the dough, did the double rise just fine, but rather than rising the third time (after forming the loaves) it just expanded versus doubling in height. I decided to bake it anyway and I ended up with flat bread. Any suggestions? Like the other poster, I don’t have the french loaf pan so I baked the bread on a cookie sheet.

  3. says

    Sorry for the delay in getting back… A few days gone. As I said, I don’t think the recipe as written can “hold up” by itself on a pizza stone or appearently on a cookie sheet. A few things to try. First I used AP flour. Bread flour expecially a good one has more protein ie gluten and would make a stronger dough. Second, decrease the water by 1-2 tablespoons would make a dry dough that would be more likely to hold up. But I think the real issue is the whole wheat flour that doesn’t contibute to the structure much.

If you like a recipe, please leave a rating. If you have a food blog in a similar manor as mine, please leave a link to your blog. If your comment is spam, rude or obnoxious it will be deleted at my discretion. Keep it polite please. See Comment Guidelines for more information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Rate this recipe: