Grilled Memphis Boneless Country Style Pork Ribs

Memphis Boneless Country Style Pork Ribs

Add the words “Memphis” and “pork” to “grilled” and “ribs”. It spells a classic with tasty heat. Try these Memphis Grilled Boneless Country Style Ribs today.

Last year I seemed to be on a “tour” of the south in my cooking. Well it worked well then so I’m going from KC (see my beef brisket post) to Memphis. Actually  a drive I have done several times. But this time just for some great taste.

Rating:

rating system 4

Almost a 5. Some really great taste that is moist and tender.

Notes: I love boneless country style ribs. They are relatively small so you can get 2-4 servings depending on size of servings. They are lean so healthier than many cuts and cook faster. What’s not to love?  Many people be get confused with bone in country style ribs. There is NO relationship other than coming from a pig. Do not cook them the same.

ingredients for rub

Mix all rub ingredients well in a small container. I have made up extra rub and will just keep some around. It seems to be good on almost everything. Use the sauce you want but excellent with my Memphis BBQ sauce.

trim the pork ribs
deepen the rib cuts
add the rub

Trim ribs of any fat cap and cut the preexisting cross cuts about 3/4 of the way through. Place a large piece of plastic wrap. Rub both sides and groves with rub.

wrap with plastic wrap

Wrap tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-4 hours.

grill over direct heat

Rest at room temp while you preheat grill on high for 10-20 minutes. Clean and oil grill. Decrease grill to medium and grill for until internal temp of 150 flipping about every 5-6 minutes. Total cooking time 20 minutes for me.

cook to 150 degrees

Memphis Grilled Boneless Country Style Pork Ribs
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Add the words "Memphis" and "pork" to "grilled" and "ribs". It spells a classic with some tasty heat.
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 slab country style boneless pork ribs
Dry Rub
  • 2 T paprika
  • 1 T brown sugar
  • 1 t black pepper
  • ½ t chili powder
  • ¼ to ½ t cayenne pepper
  • ½ t dry mustard
  • ½ t garlic powder
  • ½ t onion powder
  • 1 T kosher salt
Instructions
  1. Mix dry rub ingredients well in a small container.
  2. Trim ribs of any fat cap and cut the preexisting cross cuts about ¾ of the way through
  3. Place a large piece of plastic wrap. Rub both sides and groves with rub. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-4 hours.
  4. Remove from refrigerator, unwrap and allow to rest at room temp while you preheat grill on high for 10-20 minutes. Clean and oil grill.
  5. Decrease grill to medium and grill for until internal temp of 150 flipping about every 5-6 minutes. Total cooking time 20 minutes for me.

Last Updated
September 23 2014

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Comments

  1. says

    Thanks. This cut is a great “cooking for two” cut. For you readers out there. Mary’s blog is absolutely wonderful. If you ever need an idea for what to cook or how, she is a complete reference. Check it out in the blog list.

  2. says

    I’ve never seen a whole country style rib before, they’ve already been portioned when you get them around here. That’s the same thing as a pork collar isn’t it?

  3. says

    The confusion (I believe) is that there are two cuts called country style pork ribs. There are from the butt (shoulder) end of the loin and are scored to make serving portions. The others are from the butt(shoulder or Boston Butt) area itself and are either with or without bone. I have never seen them in a slab. The loin type always comes this way. Very odd.

    • says

      Let’s see how to say this… NEVER BOIL RIBS… yep that worked. You will find older recipes for “real” ribs like baby backs that call for boiling. This should never be done. Low and slow is how to cook them.

      For there “boneless ribs” which are really the tail end of the pork loin so they are not really “ribs”. Low and slow on a grill makes hockey pucks here. They are lean and should be cooked faster and a brine is always good. You can cook them slow in a “moist” method like sealed foil but not on a grill for several hours.

  4. says

    In the picture, it shows ground mustard and paprika, however, I don’t see it anywhere in the actual recipe. Was the picture from a different recipe?
    Also, after reading your “Never Boil Ribs” comment regarding “boneless ribs”, I’m now confused as to what kind of cut of meat I have in my fridge. How do I tell the boneless ribs apart, as I really don’t want to eat hockey puck-esque ribs.

  5. says

    Ok, first the recipe. Wow what happened here… My excuse… this recipe as been edited several times with the addition of print buttons, Ziplist, rich snippets etc… Part the the original recipe is missing. Just gone. I have replace it with that I do now. The current Memphis rub is much better anyways, less sweet and just tastier. I have used it like this and it is really good.

    Now the meat discussion. This recipe is written for what in the midwest is call “boneless country style pork ribs” they are not really ribs but the tail end of a pork loin that is cut in half and then scored into “ribs”. It is generally more marbled than pork loin and does really well with this sort of recipe. This are not related to “bone in” country style pork ribs which are cut from the pork shoulder area and if cooked rapidly like this would be a disaster. These (the bone in) need the low and slow cooking of normal ribs (baby back etc)

    The “Never Boil Ribs” applies to all ribs of any type and to this type of “ribs”also. “Parboil” is meat abuse.

    Now the question of what is in your refrigerator… hammmm I don’ know for sure. I’m unaware of any other type of boneless pork rib but if it doesn’t look like the picture, call your butcher and ask what it is.

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